Category Archives: performance drawing

#ARCdrawing

In order to generate some new work from our book, Performance Drawing: New Practices Since 1945, we warmly invite you to take part in #ARCdrawing, a participatory exhibition on Instagram.

We will be printing out each work and exhibiting them in our next show.

If you check out our Instagram profile on @performancedrawing, we have posted a series of ARC directives from our archive, like the one below. These were used in our performance ARC:I Draw for You at Wimbledon Centre for Drawing in 2010.

All you need to do is to respond to one of these instructions in your own way and in any medium you choose. Then tag us @performancedrawing and include the hashtag of the ARC you are responding to. Here’s an example of one of the original ARC directives by Carali McCall.

Performance Drawing: New Practices Since 1945

Published by: Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2020
Preface written by: Anna Furse. Foreword written by: Bonnie Marranca
Part of the Drawing In series, edited by Russell Marshall, Marsha Meskimmon and Phil Sawdon.

The first book to be published on ‘Performance Drawing’. A visual arts book that features a wide range of artists involved in the expanded field of drawing, demonstrating rigorous academic research. It establishes performance drawing as a vibrant art movement that has been progressively burgeoning since 1945 and contextualises today’s contemporary approaches – questioning what is drawing and what is performance? Each chapter focuses on a different perspective of performance drawing. Embracing the different voices and various lenses, the authors combine individual yet critical methodologies. While embedded in ephemerality and immediacy, the themes encompass body and energy, time and motion, light and space, imagined and observed, demonstrating how drawing can act as a performative tool. The dynamic interaction leads to a collective understanding of the term performance drawing and addresses the key developments and future directions of this applied drawing process.

https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/performance-drawing-9781788313841

About the Authors:

Maryclare Foá was awarded her PhD at Camberwell, UAL; an acclaimed artist with work featured in Drawing Now: Between the Lines of Contemporary Art; and recently shortlisted for Moore Prize. Jane Grisewood awarded her PhD at Central Saint Martins, UAL, where she teaches experimental drawing; her artworks and artists books are acquired in international collections, and recent exhibitions include the Line/Extended at University of Hertfordshire (UHArts). Birgitta Hosea is a time-based media artist and Professor of Moving Image at the University for the Creative Arts, UK. Previously, Head of Animation at the Royal College of Art and Central Saint Martins, where she completed her PhD in animation as a form of performance in 2012. Carali McCall exhibits internationally, awarded her PhD at Central Saint Martins, UAL. A finalist in the 2017 Jerwood Drawing Prize and awarded Arts Council England.

Endorsements:

“Performance Drawing represents a highly developed record of practice-based research, tracing the developments in contemporary drawing, building on precedents that have led to emerging trends. It analyzes the radical departure from the acceptance of drawing as a canonical medium based on mark-making on two-dimensional surfaces, into real space towards performance, light projections, film and the use of new technologies. The texts brilliantly place all these developments into a clearly articulated context.” – Therese Bolliger, artist, Canada

“While narrative forms of drawing have found favor through numerous exhibitions and publications world-wide, drawing as an inherently process-driven performative event is still lacking accessible comprehensive theoretical research. Bridging two centuries of contemporary practice, Performance Drawing will fill a huge gap for artists, teachers, scholars and art publics.” – François Morelli, Concordia University, Canada

“A valuable historical primer that examines key examples of performance drawing from the last half-century and challenges established definitions and categorisations. The authors draw a picture of the changing boundaries between art forms, showing how the blurred lines between artistic disciplines are the product of an active performative process. In addition to practitioners, this should be read by anyone interested in emerging art practices.” – Malcom Cook, Associate Professor in Film, University of Southampton

WE ARE SOCIAL / Please contact for any further information.

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@performancedrawing   #performancedrawing

@r.andf.mo

@janegrisewood

@birgittahosea

@caralimccall

 

Blind Lines

Blind Lines, Jane Grisewood 2019
Line/Extended,Art and Design Gallery, University of Hertfordshire

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Jane Grisewood works across drawing, photography, print and performance. Her practice is an ongoing exploration into time and memory where line, repetition and duration are recurring themes. Grisewood uses her body as a performative tool to create a line. During the opening reception of Line/Extended, Grisewood recreated her two-hour drawing performance Blind Lines in which she drew with graphite directly onto the Gallery wall with her eyes closed throughout. Visitors were invited to replicate the action and sensation of drawing ‘blind’ – exploring the relationship between artist and viewer.

‘UH Artists in Conversation’

“For Jane Grisewood in particular, the meditative process of drawing over a large vertical surface, with her eyes closed, is a meditative process that draws her attention inwards for the 2-hour duration of her performance.”

Dr Barbara Brownie

Blind Lines 2014-19
Performance Drawing, approx. 2 hours

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Embodied Drawing Workshops

Embodied Drawing Workshop led by Maryclare Foa, Andrew Hall and Birgitta Hosea, Drawing Research Network Conference, Loughborough University, 2019

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Embodied Drawing Workshop led by Birgitta Hosea (planned with Maryclare Foa), Hackney Wicked Festival, 2019

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dotdot dash

dotdot dash, Birgitta Hosea 2018-9

Participatory light action with lasers and improvised voice designed for public space. Originally commissioned by InspiralLondon. More info here.

Night Walking North Kent Festival, Gravesend, 2018:DDD2018-04-20 23.40.112018-04-20 23.40.322018-04-20 23.42.05

London As Park City Festival, Regents Canal, 2018:DDD_KX2018

Directions for the visual music come from a chance-based score made by walking on musical paper:DDDscore01

EMPIRE II (2017-19)

EMPIREIIparis

Empire II is a touring exhibition of artists film curated by Vanya Balogh. Originally devised for the 57th Venice Biennale in 2017, different iterations of the show with additional works were exhibited at venues including Castello 1610/A, Venice Biennale; Brussels Art Week; Unit 1 Gallery, London; White Post/Corridor Gallery, London; SPEKTRUM, Berlin; Provincial Project Space, Kendal, Cumbria; (2017); Haus Gallery, Tallinn Art Week, Estonia; Rogue Gallery Studio, Hastings; Super Pop, Madrid; Etablissement Culturel Solidare, Paris (2018) and 58th Venice Biennale; Oaxaco Museum of Contemporary Art, Mexico (curated by Vanya Balogh and Marissa Polin, 2019).

Works included:MM Kizi Film Still Title Nearly not quite
Nearly, Not Quite (Short film, Maryclare Foa as M.M.Kizi, 2017)

TensioneTensione: How is that going to work? (Short film, Jane Grisewood, Carali McCall, 2017)

Erasure_still03Erasure (Animation, Birgitta Hosea, 2017)

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Each artist made additional photo works for EMPIRE II: Playing God, a new version of the exhibition for Tallinn, and abstract videos for a new section, The Void, shown at MACO, Oaxaca and 58th Venice Biennale.

DzS9gHIWoAAF8oKEmpireIIMACOPosterRoomMACOPosterRoomMACO2PlayingGodMACO_textAll the Ghosts I Know and One Other R&F.Mo.2018JPGAll The Ghosts I Know and One Other, Maryclare Foa (as R&F Mo), 2018

Bird4_flattened_webUntitled Hitchcock Still #1,  Birgitta Hosea, 2018

PlayingGodMACO2PlayingGodMACO

TheVoid2TheVoidTheVoid4

 

Notes on a Table, Folkestone, 2016

Notes on a Table (Folkestone Green) and (Folkestone Blue)
(Maryclare Foá, Jane Grisewood, Birgitta Hosea, Carali McCall)

Residency at Whelkboy Gallery, Creative Quarter, Folkestone, August 2016

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MarKings: symposium and festival of performance and drawing

Notes on a Table (House of Illustration) 2016  (performance by Maryclare Foá, Jane Grisewood, Birgitta Hosea, Carali McCall)

8-9th July 2016, MarKings, Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins UAL/House of Illustration

Approximately: 240 x 128 cm, conversation, sound, graphite and coloured crayon on paper

Event review by John Miers in Spark Journal

Line Dialogue VI, 2013

Line Dialogue VI (2013), Carali McCall and Jane Grisewood

30-minute performance drawing in front of live audience, charcoal and graphite, overall 400 x 200 cm. ‘Draw to Perform’ exhibition at Performance Space, Hackney, London.

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Rosary Drawing XII, 2015

RosaryDrawing12_Hands
[Rosary Drawing XII performance, rehearsal in studio, Birgitta Hosea, 2015]

BH-RD_remnant
[Remnants from Rosary Drawing XII performance, Birgitta Hosea, 2015]

This work was developed by Birgitta Hosea during a residency in a former convent in Atina, Lazio, Italy that was organised and curated by Rekha Sameer.

AtinaAsilo

Although brought up aetheist, Birgitta Hosea spent the entire residency drawing her recently deceased and much mourned Swedish grandmother’s broken rosary beads and trying to learn more about the Catholic faith of her mother’s family.

Mormor's_rosary

The more she drew, the more she began to think about about both of her grandmothers, one Swedish, one Scottish, and indeed about all of the women who work tirelessly and selflessly for their families: invisible labour that is taken for granted and forgotten about.

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[Image by Chris Simpson, 2015, cropped]

RosaryDrawings2015

By the 12th drawing, she decided to use the tools and materials of domestic cleaning to make a drawing of the rosary beads – scrubbing away the paper to create the highlighlights on each bead. As the antique Roman floor was too delicate to make a performance using scouring on, out of the the many drawings she had made, at the final exhibition she chose to only show these.

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[Rosary Drawing XII, Atina Residency exhibition, Palazzo Ducale dei Cantelmo, Atina, Italy, 2015]

For Hosea, this work captured everything she had learnt on the residency – that the actions of cleaning and the time taken to scrub each piece of paper could be recorded in a sequence of images that ressemble a filmstrip.  Like a filmstrip, the rosary is also a device to record actions over time – the prayers that are supposed to be said for each bead. So for her, this work is a type of animation.

Asked to submit experimental animation for Beyond Noumenon, an exhibition and forum at Sichuan Institute of Fine Arts in Chongqing, China, she submitted a proposal to perform this work as a piece of live animation and, to her surprise, was accepted with great enthusiasm and generosity by curators Tingting Lu and Tianran Duan.

She then performed the drawing at the private view next to other wall-based sequential images she had made. Scrubbed clean of all makeup, on her hands and knees, she said invocations while going through the rosary beads and scrubbed one piece of paper for each bead on the string.

MePerformance_99ys
[Rosary Drawing XII performance, Birgitta Hosea, Sichuan Institute of Fine Arts, 2016]

Following this exhibition, she performed the work again at 51% Remember Her, a group exhibition of feminist art curated by Rebecca Feiner at Tower Gallery, London.

RosaryDrawing12_Performance51%RosaryDrawing12_HandsActionRosaryDrawing12_Performance@51_v2
[Rosary Drawing XII performance, Birgitta Hosea, Tower Gallery, London, 2017]

Click here to view the 51% Remember Her catalogue: 51%_Catalogue

This work then became part of her solo show Erasure, at Hanmi Gallery, Seoul, Korea in 2018. View catalogue here.

Interview about the show by Studio International.

Footage of the show (silent) with video documentation of Rosary XII performance at the private view: